Johnson & Wales Wildcat Monument Creation Copy

A step by step guide to how “Wildcat” was created from conception to installation

Design

Sketches

ssjg

Computer Model

Dfhsd

CNC Enlargement
Sculpting

Digital Sculpting

Clay Sculpting

Casting

Molding

Waxes

Shell

Metal – Pouring and Casts

Fabrication

Delivery & Installation

Project Status as of Jan 9th

Project Status as of Dec 16th

Johnson & Wales Wildcat Monument Creation

A step by step guide to how “Wildcat” was created from conception to installation

Design

Sketches

ssjg

Computer Model

Dfhsd

CNC Enlargement
Sculpting

Digital Sculpting

Clay Sculpting

Casting

Molding

Waxes

Shell

Metal – Pouring and Casts

Fabrication

Delivery & Installation

About Mike Fields | Fine Art Bronze Sculptor

Mike Fields | Bronze Wildlife SculpturesAt a young age, Mike Fields had already established himself as an accomplished sculptor.

In his early teens he began studying under his father, Chester Fields, learning technique, form and design. Throughout his career, Mike has maintained the drive to continue to create greater work each time he steps into his studio.

With time and consideration, Mike breathes life into his works of creation. Mike develops his gift for realism with each precise movement of his instrument. Quality workmanship is never compromised in order to release a new piece into the marketplace before Mike believes it is ready—his pieces require 500 to 2000 hours to complete, and each new composition demands more attention to meet his growing expectations.

“There seems to be subjective as well as objective measures of art. Although art is subjective in its nature, I believe objective qualities such as attention to its craftsmanship and the depth of thought that go into a work are necessary to support the power of the piece. I am only beginning to understand that art is much more than a mechanical process. A painting or sculpture could be well executed, yet have no depth of meaning or emotion. I believe the true challenge to an artist is to bring the work to life and move the viewer.”

Mike’s deep inquiry into style, culture, and methodologies transcends his work into powerful, well-executed pieces. His father emphasized the importance of proper proportions and attention to detail throughout his tutorship. It is from this foundation that Mike intends to add his own expression of art. He has already gained recognition from art collectors and dealers nationwide.

Mike believes art comes in many forms and surrounds us at all times in our daily life. “The very seeing of beauty is an art. It is from this source that I am beginning to gain a deeper inspiration and am forever humbled.

Mike’s personal journey with art mirrors his path through life. “I am becoming at peace with the discontent that drives me forward in my life and my career. I am constantly seeking to improve my work and my character. Since childhood, I have been seeking answers to the deep questions that are at the heart of us all and have not been deterred by the answers that are so readily available. This inquiry into truth has added a depth of meaning, peace and an appreciation for life that I could not have found any other way.

“I am still discovering what I would like to express through my work and how I would like to convey it. Art offers a rare opportunity to share a point of view—aesthetically or intellectually—with others, which may be difficult to express through other means. I would like to focus on this ability of art in my future work.”

View More of Mike’s Work

Mike’s Traditional Sculptures


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Mike’s Contemporary / Modern Sculptures


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Washington State University – 15′ Cougar Mascot Monument

Washington State University Project

PULLMAN, Wash. – Cougar Pride, a 15-foot tall monument commissioned by Gary Schneidmiller (WSU class of ’71) and created by artists Mike Fields, was dedicated during a ceremony at the Martin Stadium plaza, Saturday, Nov. 22 at 10 a.m., two hours prior to kickoff of the Apple Cup, proudly sponsored by Boeing.

Dignitaries who spoke at the dedication ceremony included Governor Chris Gregoire, WSU President Elson S. Floyd, Fran Forgette, Chair, WSU Board of Regents, Director of Athletics Jim Sterk, the Fields, and Schneidmiller.
The monument, which Governor Gregoire remarked “is a wonderful tribute” to the university, is named Cougar Pride, and stands 15-feet high on its pedestal and is the largest bronze sculpture on campus. It was brought to Pullman, Wednesday night from Joseph, Ore., where it was cast in bronze, and placed Thursday, Nov. 20.
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In its entirety, the sculpture is 14-feet, 5-inches long nose to tail, 6-feet, 4-inches wide, and weighs approximately 4,500 pounds; the cougar itself will stand 11-feet, 4-inches high. It will be located on the Martin Stadium Plaza, adjacent to the main thoroughfare of campus, Stadium Way.
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“Washington State University deserved a magnificent art piece and symbol that would forever be the equal of a world-class institution,” Schneidmiller said earlier this week. “I hope that Cougars everywhere will agree we have succeeded.”
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“Gary is a great friend and supporter of Cougar Athletics and Washington State University,” Sterk said earlier this week. “This sculpture is a testament to this fact. His generosity and love of WSU have made this sculpture a reality, and it is something that past, present, and future generations of Cougars will take great satisfaction in and be able to enjoy forever.”
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With Cougar Pride, Schneidmiller wished to honor his father, Manuel, a 1941 graduate; as well as his mother, Gladys, who still attends all of the WSU football games. In addition, he wished to preserve the tradition of Butch.

From 1927 to 1978, Washington State’s mascot was a live cougar named Butch. During this time, six cougars served as the school’s mascot. The cougars lived in a cage located adjacent to the football stadium, which became known as Butch’s Den. The tradition came to end with the passing of Butch VI in 1978.
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However, as described on the plaque dedication, 30 years later, Butch has returned home with Cougar Pride. The monument is located adjacent to the area where Butch the mascot called home.

Crafted by Mike Fields, who is based in Spokane, Wash., the process of creating the statue began in May and was only completed earlier this month when the monument was cast in bronze.
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“My Dad and I want to express how pleased and honored we are to create this sculpture for Martin Stadium,” said Mike Fields. “We were excited to have the opportunity to work on it.”

“They did an amazing job,” Schneidmiller said of the Fields. “He created a masterful piece that represented the entire University.”

“Mike Fields has created a sculpture that will become a signature landmark of this great University,” Sterk said. “It is a terrific work of art.”

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The public will have the opportunity to purchase 11-, 18- or 30-inch miniature versions of the statue in bronze casting. More information on how to purchase the miniatures will be made available in the near future at the website cougarpride.com.

Cougarpride.com Find out more about this project and sale of small replica bronzes

Step-by-Step Creation of Monument See everything that goes into creating a monument of this magnitude!

WSU Cougar Prowl Football Home Game Tradition